How I took that Shot – Anthony O’Connor

05 Anthony O'Connor - Urban

Anthony O'Connor took first place in Grade A in our recent 'Urban' competition with the self portrait/ graffiti shot. This is how he made the image:

I had a few different ideas for the Urban theme but settled on graffiti, and there are plenty of good examples around.

I took the image in the car park on White Street, Cork where most of the wall space is covered in works by various graffiti artists.

I tried a number of different compositions standing in and out of the shots, this one was my favourite.

It’s a HDR image processed in Photomatix essentials from a single RAW image, and finished in Photoshop.

The camera was mounted on a tripod using the timer. Settings were: f/8, 1/30 sec, ISO 100, 24mm.

Move the slider left and right below to compare the pre and post processed shots.

 

- Anthony O'Connor

See also:
How I took that Shot - JIm O'Neill
How I took that Shot - Keith Johnson
Competition Gallery
Competition Results and 2016 League Table 

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How I took that Shot – Jim O’Neill

19 Jim O'Neill - Urban

Jim O'Neill took first place in Grade B in our recent 'Urban' competition with the shot of Cork City's French Church St. above. This is how he made the image:

I had a shot in mind for the "Urban" theme competition and thought Cork City would be the best place. With the help of "Google Street Viewer" I set my sights on a couple of streets off Patrick Street. I was looking for a narrow street with high buildings and settled on "French Church Street"

I took several shots at different angles. The low angle shot, to me, gave good depth to the image and I was happy with the leading lines from the side and the drain up the middle.

To add mood to the image I thought Black and White worked best but the sky was too grey and blown out. With an "app" on the ipod i was able to change the sky to add more mood.

Taken on Nikon D5000, Tokina 11-16mm wide angle lens at 12mm focal length. Aperture 7.1, ISO 400, 1/6s shutter speed. iPod app, "Juxtaposer"

- Jim O'Neill

See also:
How I took that Shot - Anthony O'Connor
How I took that Shot - Keith Johnson
Competition Gallery
Competition Results and 2016 League Table 

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How I took that Shot – Keith Johnson

15 Keith Johnson -Urban

Keith Johnson took first place in Grade C, for the second time in a row, in our recent 'Urban' competition with the unusual shot of Cobh town above. This is how he made the image:

This unusual picture of Cobh was taken from the top deck of the cruise liner, MSC Splendida, while it was berthed in Cobh last summer.
Taken handheld, hanging over the top guard rail to get a clear shot!
Using my Canon 650 with a 17=85 lens ISO 100, F20, 1/30sec

 

- Keith Johnson

See also:
How I took that Shot - Anthony O'Connor
How I took that Shot - Jim O'Neill
Competition Gallery
Competition Results and 2016 League Table 

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ECCG ‘Urban’ Competition – 01/03/2016

'Urban' was the theme of the second internal competition of 2016 held at the Midleton Park Hotel on Tuesday 01/03/16. Following two viewings of the twenty-two entries, marks were awarded which yielded the following results:

Results Table

Photographer of the Year 2015, Anthony O'Connor was back on the winners podium in Grade A  while Mervyn Daly was second and Kevin Day, third.

Jim O'Neill came first in Grade B with Denis O'Flynn only one point behind in second place. Dave Geary took third place.

With two in a row for the year, Keith Johnson came first again in Grade C with Eileen Upton taking second place and Magda Mani continuing her recent good form by taking third.

In the overall high scores across all three Grades, Anthony O'Connor, Jim O'Neill and Denis O'Flynn took the honours.

Well done to all entrants, especially those new members entering for the first time, and congratulations to those who gained valuable points towards this year's Photographer of the Year competition.

The image below is the overall highest scoring image by Anthony O'Connor. Click the image to see all the entries. Enjoy!

05 Anthony O'Connor - Urban

 

See also:
How I took that Shot - Anthony O'Connor
How I took that Shot - Jim O'Neill
How I took that Shot - Keith Johnson
Competition Gallery
Competition Results and 2016 League Table

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Cork City Shoot – 13/02/2016

Cork City 13-02-16 NL-6

On a wet, dull and overcast Saturday afternoon that was the 13th February 2016, a visit to Cork City was the latest ECCG shoot. After meeting up at Kent Railway Station, the rainy weather did not deter us on our 'tour' of the City in a quest to capture a variety of images from Urban, cityscape and Black & White themes. We embarked on foot (not tempted to hire the Coka Cola bikes!) on a tour of Cork City taking in various landmarks around the city. We were fortunate that the weather started to clear up. No sunshine but at least it was dry so we were spared a drenching.

We made our way across to Parnell Square and onto one of the main streets in the city, St. Oliver Plunkett Street. This street is one of main commercial arteries with a variety of foods and clothes shops, cafes and restaurants. It is also the longest street in the city. We stopped momentarily to take photos of the many side streets located to the right and left of this long street as we went.

Cork City 13-02-16 EU-2We then made our way to the one of the 'jewels of Cork City' the Old English market. This market is one of the oldest markets in Cork with long history dating back to the 1788. It is the main shopping institution with Cork people with its unique character, cosmopolitan atmosphere, vibrancy and rich shopping experience. Various stalls selling a variety of farm produce and a more exotic fare with foodstuffs from all over the world as well as the traditional meat, tripe and 'drisheen and fish. The array of colour provided great photo opportunities in this interesting place.

From the market we made our way onto the Grand Parade, which runs from the South Mall to St. Patrick's Street. We stopped at the National Monument at the end of the Parade. This commemorates the rebellions of 1798, 1803, 1848 and 1867 and is described as displaying an early  Gothic style. From here we continued the shoot, crossing the River Lee via the Nano Nagle footbridge named after the famous Cork woman who founded the Presentation Sisters religious order in 1775.

Cork City 13-02-16 EU-7We then walked to St Fin Barre's Cathedral situated near the heart of City. Before going into the Cathedral grounds we took a detour to the left of the side entrance, up steps towards Barrack Street to view a very colourful urban street art, primarily recalling the Rolling Stones Irish tour in 1965. Once we finished here we returned to the St Fin Barre's cathedral. The building was built in 1863 by the Victorian architect, William Bruges and was dedicated to St Fin Barre, replacing a previous building which once stood on the same spot believed to be the site of a monastery founded by the St Fin Barre in the 7th century. The present cathedral building is from the neo gothic period and is made from Cork limestone, marble as well as Bath Stone. We spent some time in the grounds of the cathedral capturing the immense exterior of this  towering building with its spiky spires, gurning gargoyles and rich sculpture which all contribute to it's magnificent presence and stature.

After the cathedral, the city shoot continued down Crawford street and onto Washington street where we visited an unusual antiques shops with records, relics and other curiosities on display. We then made our way along Washington street stopping to admire and take shots of dynamic artistic wall art painted by local artists as well as some buildings of architectural interest.

Our next 'port of call' was the Mercy Hospital, which is the second largest hospital in the busy city centre. The oldest part of the hospital was built between 1764 and 1767 and was was originally built as the Mansion House for the city's Lord Mayor but was later used as an educational establishment before becoming the Mercy hospital in 1857.

Cork City 13-02-16 NL-32As we made our way back towards the city centre we stopped, en route, to take photos of the red and white wrought iron foot bridge located in the North Mall area and also the very colourful buildings on the other side of the river. As we approached the Corn Market and North Main streets there were more beautiful urban art images to be found. On reaching the top of North Main street we crossed into Paul Street walking to the end of Half Moon street to view the amazing wall art on the side wall of the Cork Opera House. The large mural which runs the length of the street features giant stylised portraits in three tones of electric blue of literary giants such as George Bernard Shaw, WB Yeats, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, Samuel Becket and more.

We finally made our way to St. Patrick's Street where we went for a well deserved cuppa! Afterwards some of us returned to the railway station via Mac Curtain Street. An enjoyable day was had by all with some great images captured. It was an ideal opportunity to source some black & white, urban and city scape images. A very worthwhile shoot despite a wet start.

See a full gallery of images from the shoot here. Enjoy!

 - Noelle Lowney

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